Unity 4D #3: Rendering 4D Objects

This article will explain how to render 4D objects in Unity, using three separate technique: orthographic projection, perspective projection and cross-section.

You can find all the articles in this series here:

A link to download the Unity4D package can be found at the end of this article.

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Unity 4D #2: Extending Unity to 4D

This article will show how to extend Unity to support four-dimensional geometry. This is the second article in a series of four, and the first one which will probably start discussing the Mathematics and the C# code necessary to store and manipulate 4D objects in Unity.

You can find all the articles in this series here:

A link to download the Unity4D package can be found at the end of this article.

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Slippy Maps with Unity

A slippy map (sometimes also referred to as tiled web map, tile map, or simply interactive map) is a web-based map that can be zoomed in and out seamlessly. The most popular slippy map you might be familiar with is Google Maps, alongside many others like that.

This tutorial will show you how to create your own web-based slippy map with Unity. Such a technique can be used to create interactive maps for your own games, or to better explore complex phenomena such as fractals or even Mathematical functions. For clarity, the actual map will be created with Unity, but it will be served using a JavaScript library called LeafletJS. A link to download the full Unity package is also available at the end of the article.

The image used in the cover has been generated using Stamen.

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Seam Carving

Seam carving is a technique that can be used to resize images, which is also known as liquid rescaling. Compared to the traditional resizing tool, it does not “stretch” the image, but it selectively removes the pixels which contain the least amount of information. As a result, it allows to shrink images preserving most of the details.

Seam carving is an example of a context-aware resizing algorithm, as it does not treat images as mere collections of pixels. By all means, it can be considered an AI-powered algorithm. The “AI part” resides in the fact that it is able to identify which pixels to remove on its own. However, it does so without any neural network and—most importantly—without the need to be trained on external data. Hence, it belongs to the field of what I call Classical AI, conversely to the more recent field of Deep Learning. With AI-powered tools becoming more and more popular, I find it helpful to show how a lot can be achieved with some clever algorithms, without the need to train expensive neural network models.

If you are interested in learning more about tools like DALL·E 2 and Midjourney, I would suggest checking one of my most detailed articles titled The Rise of AI Art.

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Sunrise Sort: The Forgotten Sorting Algorithm

This article is about an interesting, yet forgotten sorting algorithm: the Sunrise sort. It is possibly the only one to have a rather unusual property: it is fully unstable.

Sorting has been a recurring theme on this blog, from The Incredibly Challenging Task of Sorting Colours to GPU Sorting (animation below). If sorting algorithms—especially the more “esoteric” ones—are a subject that easily captures your imagination, this is an article you definitely want to read.

And for the ones who will dare to stay till the end, you will discover what made the Sunrise sort a “forgotten” algorithm.

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Delegates, Lambda Expressions & Closures in C#

If you are familiar with programming, you might have heard of a specific paradigm called functional programming. Most modern languages, such as Java and C#, have integrated some functional elements over time. Other, like Scala and Haskell, were built around that very idea of functional programming.

This online course will look at some of the functional features available in C# 3.0, including the concept of anonymous functions, delegates and lambda expressions. But before doing that, we need to understand what functional programming actually means.

If you are interested, keep reading, and we will explore the following topics:

  • Anonymous functions
  • Delegates
  • Anonymous delegates
  • Multicast delegates
  • Lambda expressions
  • Lambda statements
  • Expression-body members
  • Expression trees
  • Local functions
  • Closures
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Colour Curve Correction

This is the third and final part of the tutorial dedicated to one of the most used Mathematical tools in Game Development: linear interpolation! In this part, we will explore how to use it to correct colour curves.

You can find a link to download the C# scripts and the Unity package used at the end of this post.

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Piecewise Interpolation

This is the second part of the tutorial dedicated to one of the most used Mathematical tools in Game Development: linear interpolation! In this part, we will explore how to extend the concept of linear interpolation to non-linear mappings. The final part will explore how to use them to correct colour curves.

You can find a link to download the C# scripts and the Unity package used at the end of this post.

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Inverse Kinematics in 3D

This tutorial will teach you how to master inverse kinematics in 3D: the technique that solves the problem of moving a robotic arm to reach for a specific target.

You can read the rest of this online course here:

A link to download the entire Unity package can be found at the end of this tutorial.

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